Librarian combines passions for literature, science into career

By Jack Pinsky ’14, Staff Writer

While in the libraries many students may be too deep in their studying to notice that there are people working all around them, including Laura Eiford, a science librarian in the Martin Library of the Sciences.

Eiford has worked as the Science Librarian at F&M for three years. She was born in Honolulu, Hawaii and raised in Seattle, Wash. Eiford is a graduate of the University of Washington and worked in the library while studying there. In fact, she enjoyed it so much that she pursued it as a career. Eiford majored in biology in college and sees working in Martin Library a bridging of these two interests.

At the University of Washington Eiford was a part of the Honors Society and a club called Students in Service. This club helped students volunteer in the surrounding community through Americorps. Some of her most memorable times volunteering were cleaning up parks, spending time in nursing homes, or, in her words, “doing whatever needed to be done,” at a local homeless shelter. An interesting event she attended through Students in Service was a convention of the First Nations, an association of Native Americans. According to Eiford, it was exciting to get a glimpse of a different culture.

A self-described animal lover, Eiford worked for the Wildlife Conservation Society through the Bronx Zoo after graduating, as well.

And, yes, Eiford did reveal little-known facts about Martin Science Library. For instance, the basement of Martin has a mask from the film, Planet of the Apes, as well as other paraphernalia from the movie. There are many other objects held in Martin’s basement; Eiford has even decorated her office with old, empty medical bottles that were found in the basement.

Although she does work in the science library on campus, Eiford noted that many of her favorite books are novels. And although she claims to enjoy reading books of many different genres, she cites three fantasy-fiction authors as her favorites: Isaac Asimov, J. R. R. Tolkien, and Guy Gavriel Kay.

One of Eiford’s favorite memories from F&M was the Common Hour presentation led by Brian Greene on the nature of the universe. She also enjoys the friendly atmosphere provided by her colleagues in Martin Library.

“[People are] always popping in and checking up [in their offices],” Eiford said.

When asked what piece of advice she would give the students of F&M, Eiford supplied a line fit for a person accustomed to spending time in a building meant for research.

“[When it comes to academics], it’s easy to answer a question,” Eiford said. “The hard part is finding the right question to ask.”

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