Op-Ed: Editor on recent resignation of President Trump’s National Security Advisor

By Joe Yamulla || Opinion & Editorial Editor

Photo courtesy of slate.com

As I sit back and observe the Trump administration, I feel like I’m watching an episode of House of Cards. I have about as much trust for President Trump as I do for the villainous, fictitious Frank Underwood. I’ve been outwardly critical of Trump’s decisions, notably for his travel ban and the most ridiculous project I can even fathom with the “Great Wall.” When it comes to my confidence in the Trump administration, I have just about zero. When I thought things were at their lowest, I was unfortunately surprised to find out it could actually get worse. This past week, National Security Advisor Michael Flynn resigned after allegedly being dishonest with Trump and Vice President Pence about his communications with Russia. Flynn’s suspect and questionable actions don’t necessarily come as a shocker to me, especially with all of the Trump-Putin friendship rumors. However, I’m truly surprised that the Trump administration could show to be even more dysfunctional and dubious.

The American people have a right to be weary right now. How are we supposed to take this? Are we really supposed to believe that Trump had zero knowledge of Flynn’s contacts with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak? I certainly am both doubtful and cautious when it comes to any statement or decision made by Trump or his administration. Trump’s staff is becoming famous for their disreputable behavior and for starting a war in many ways on the press. However, the press has a responsibility to offer the American people the truth and the reality about what’s happening in Washington. And one thing is for certain, the White House is a tumultuous place right now.

Not only are Democrats displeased and concerned about what President Trump is doing, but also some Republicans, specifically Senator John McCain. McCain was outwardly critical of President Trump’s allegiance with Putin in his USA Today editorial. Specifically, McCain praised Russian dissident Vladimir Kara-Murza and argued that Trump should be allying himself with men of his character who stand by the upstanding values and morals of the United States. Furthermore, he wrote, “From that world order, the United States has accrued vast wealth and power, and a greater share of humanity than ever has escaped tyranny and poverty. Its preservation must remain the first security priority of the United States government.” (http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2017/02/13/trump-gets-it-wrong-on-putin-russia-moral-equals-john-mccain-column/97822770/). McCain’s statements on Trump are extremely crucial in reflecting the bipartisan displeasure and distrust for Donald Trump and what he has brought to Washington. I worry about where we go from here, because the administration has not offered the American people the necessary evidence to trust what they are doing. One thing is clear, Flynn’s resignation showed me that there are no limits to the dysfunctionality of this administration. When I thought things couldn’t get worse, I was unpleasantly surprised. What’s next, President Trump? I hope to wake up to some good news tomorrow. However, I’m doubtful that will happen.

Junior Joe Yamulla is the Opinion & Editorial Editor. His email is jyamulla@fandm.edu.

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